Fun: Random Title Generators

Have you ever stared at your manuscript, or your outline, while making a face like this:

Gollum plays the riddle game with Bilbo via The Hobbit

If the answer is yes, then welcome to the club!  the other day I was emailing with an author who joking said, “I wish they had book title generators” and I thought, “I’ll bet they do!” So off I hopped to google and – Guess what! – they do!

 Fiction Alley generator: For this one you need to input words and it will rearrange them into several titles. Yes, you could do it yourself, but it’s still kind of fun.

Warpcore SF generator: this one gives you both a title and a series name, but you only get one. To get another you need to hit the back button.  Still pretty fun.

Random title generator: This one gives you six at a time, and actually came up with some pretty compelling titles. There are some mature content words involved occasionally.

Fantastic Random title Generator: This one also has six titles at a time, as well as links to a Romantic Title Generator and a Sci-Fi/Fantasy title generator.

I had a lot of fun generating random titles, and even made notes of a few of them. But, beyond entertainment, what value does a title generator really have? For me it helps me to think “outside the box” – or rather outside “my” box, so to speak.  It actually suggested “Children of Petals” to me which, while it wouldn’t work itself, led me to think of Children of Shadows (Shadows being a word I have collected on my “good words for titles” list). Would I suggest straight up using one of the generated titles? Sure, why not, if it fits your story.  And even if none of the titles do, it’s a great way to kill twenty minutes.

How do you come up with titles or what are some of your favorites that someone else has written?

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The Anatomy of a Vampire Cover

 

Have you ever noticed that book covers in a particular genre are very similar? For instance:

.

Why do they look alike? Because the point of a book cover is to attract readers who will like it. For the most part, book covers are not an art, as many people perceive them, but rather a marketing tool – an extended advertisement  if you will, and so there are certain “formulas” to it depending on your genre. They instantly tell the reader what to expect, usually because they look similar to every other cover that has an even remotely similar story, as in the video above.For instance, let’s say you read a book with a tattooed lady’s back on the cover.You like it the book. Now you see a new book with a similar cover. Instantly, maybe without you even knowing it, you have associated this new book with the previous one you liked. It’s just a marketing trick like so many others.

But, if not applied properly that trick can back fire. When you associate that tattooed lady with the previous book, you don’t just associate that you liked it, but also elements of it that you liked. For instance if it had a lot of fight scenes you’re probably to going to expect this new book to have a lot of fight scenes. If it had a strong romance you’re going to expect the new book to have the same. In other words, whoever thinks of the new design first and manages to brand it –  the first book that came out with a tattooed woman’s back – is the one that will forever subtly set the tone for all the following books using that cover.

If we go to Amazon and do a search for “vampire”, we see that there are only six styles of covers for them, and each cover tells us what to “expect” and attracts a certain audience.

1. Hunky man/Sexy scene.  This cover demonstrates that the focus of the story is on the hunky male and/or the sex between him and his counterpart. It caters to those readers who find hunky men attractive, most notably women, and tends to turn away straight male readers. If I buy this book I expect lots of sex. I expect the hero to be called “beautiful” and “sensual” at least ten times. There might be some violence. If the hero is alone on the cover, I expect violent scenes to end with the female trembling from fear or shock and being rescued by the hunky hero so that they can go have sex. If the couple are pictured together she may be a bit tougher, but they will still leave the battle and have hot, steamy sex. If there are two men, we automatically expect a steamy M/M plot. There’s a good chance that the book will be either from his POV or switch back and forth between him and the woman. Either way,  I wouldn’t be surprised if the hero has at least one monologue where he feels regret and angst and tells himself that he should “stay away” from his significant other.

2. Kick ass/sexy/sad woman. This kind of cover says that the woman is the main component in the story. Though this cover is more friendly to a male audience, it still attracts primarily women. If the female pictured is “kick ass” woman I expect the heroine to be  super tough and not need a man, the kind who deftly outwits all the men who cross her path and always comes out on top. I also expect violence since she is probably some kind of hunter/assassin/killer. If it is a sexy woman then I still expect her to “need no man” but she will be having hot, tumultuous sex with at least one, and possibly two or more. I expect very light violence, with the main focus being on her sensuality or her burgeoning relationship. If she’s in modern clothes I expect it to be clicky and feminist ala Sex in the City, but if she has more historical attire then the hero will “tame” her. If the woman looks sad or lost then I expect the book to focus on her emotional journey as she overcomes some terrible tragedy. There may or may not be sex in this story. Violence will be light.

3. The totally cliché vampire element. Dark castles. Bats. A man/woman with fangs. A goblet of blood. This cover is more male friendly and it shows that the main element of the story IS the vampires – everything else comes second. I would expect something heavy, historical and/or traditional ala Dracula with a lot of horror elements. Someone will use old fashioned/obsolete words. There is a good chance of violence and it will probably be bloody, though the descriptions may or may not be  gruesome. There will probably not be explicit sex (if the fanged woman is pictured alone, see #2. If she is posed with a man in a sensual scene, see #1). There is also a good chance that it is told from a male POV and someone is probably wearing a cape.

4. Cutesy art work. This cover says “Chic-lit” and makes me think of the Ya Ya Sisterhood and stuff like that. Cute, modern, edgy and feminine. I expect the vampires to be worried about fitting into their skinny jeans, or cleverly outwitting their boyfriends. They will drink margaritas and have girls night. Needless to say, these covers are more likely to attract women.

5. Totally random object/scene. Think Twilight, or Fifty Shades. Though the artists will cite symbolic bull, this cover tells you nothing. Their goal is to catch your eye with their simplicity. It is the color scheme and font choices that will tell you whether it is a “masculine” or “feminine” book. If it has a funky font I expect a YA novel with light violence and some romance, probably a girl who is discovering her “abilities”. A serif font leads me to expect a more serious story, possibly with a male protagonist who has deep regret over something. Sex and violence are both possibilities. A sans serif font will tell me that the protagonist (be they male or female) is tough, there is plenty of violence, and it’s probably going to be fast paced and contemporary. A script/cursive style font says it is a romance and more than likely the protagonist is a female. There is probably sex involved, violence is doubtful. If it’s super curly or cutesy then see #6.

6. Completely out there. This cover says “I may have vampires, but I’m different”, which makes me expect different. In fact I will expect it to lean heavily towards another genre, depending on the style, such as fantasy, sci-fi etc. That there would be lots of violence would not surprise me at all. The same with sex. There may even be deeper themes involved. I’m not going to lie when I say that these are the covers I am most attracted to.

signature for whiteWhen you run across these kind of covers, what do they say to you? Do they make you expect the same things they make me expect, or do you perceive them differently? Which kind is your favorite? Your least favorite? Why?

 

 

 

 

Love in the Kitchen

Get a copy today!

It’s almost Valentines Day, so I thought I’d repost this as it seems fitting. 

———————————————————————————————————–

Jorick and Katelina are cooking up a storm (erm, sort of..) in the a flash fiction story That Certain Sparkle, which you can read in the  FREE flash fiction/cookbook collection Love in the Kitchen: Recipes and Flash Fiction compiled by Ashlynn Monroe.

Jorick and Katelina aren’t the only ones serving up their own brand of romance. You can also find stories and recipes from authors Ryan Loveless,  Leanne Dyck, Julie Lynn Hayes, Eden Baylee, J.M. Kelley, Berengaria Brown, Amy Valenti, Valerie Holyoak,  Lily Sawyer and Ashlynn Monroe. 

Get your Free copy from Smashwords and get to cookin’!

Or:

All Romance

iTunes

Kobo

 

 

 


I’m Telling the Truth…

See what I mean:

ATW: How do you handle unfavorable reviews?

Joleene: Most authors say to ignore them, but the truth is that this is impossible. Rather than giving you the “publicly acceptable” answer, I am going to do something scary and tell the truth!

The first thing I do is get incensed. “How dare they not like my work?” Then, after I calm down, I read it over and over, until there is no more sting in the review. A that point I analyze whether their complaints are valid. By this I mean “the plot was hard to follow” vs “this book was too short for free” (I actually get the second one. Those I ignore because the book description starts with the words: Short. 8,000 words.) If the complaint is genuine, then I try to apply remedy that in future works.

I know, I know, it’s pretty terrifying, but don’t let that stop you from checking out my interview, which Authors to Watch (run by the talented Tricia Drammeh) has so kindly hosted.  Be sure to check out Tricia’s work while you’re there!

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Next Big Thing Blog Hop

I’m honored to be chosen to be part of this blog hop, and I’d like to thank Ron Voigts  for tagging me to participate. This gives us all a chance to view new releases from authors we admire, as well as introduce us to some works in progress.


Ten Interview Questions for “The Next Big Thing” are as follows:

What is the working title of your book?

Heart of the Raven, named after the mythological heart of Lilith, who is the mother of the vampires. Or, at least it’s a mythological object in my Amaranthine universe. The truth is, I only invented the heart as an object because I wanted to use it as a future book title.

Where did the idea come from for the book?

It’s the fifth book in the Amaranthine series, so many of the plot ideas have been percolating for awhile. I wanted to send my vampires overseas because most vampire series do at some point. Usually vampires go to Europe and, while they do have to go to Germany, I wanted them to do something unusual after that. Originally I’d planned Mexico, but Twilight used it so heavily that I chose another country. The problem was to figure out WHY they’d go there. And then I saw a documentary a year ago and it all fell into place. Well, with a lot of research.

What genre does your book fall under?

Paranormal. If given no other choice I’d say Paranormal Romance because it has some hawt vampires in it and of course Katelina and Jorick’s romance. Oh, and a couple of sex scenes. There hasn’t been much killing thus far. By chapter ten the body count is only two vampires and *maybe* a couple of human port patrol officers. (It’s a bit ambiguous what happened to them in this draft.)

Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition?

That’s a tough one. Jonathan Harvey once did a casting call for the series, and he did a pretty good job. I agree with most of his choices, except Patrick, and Jorick. I really don’t know who would play them.  Verchiel could be played by any number of smexy Japanese actors, though I lean towards Hideaki Takizawa.

What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?

Katelina and Jorick land in international hot water while trying to recover a legendary artifact, said to make its owner invincible.

Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?

Self pubbed because I like being self pubbed.

How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?

I’m setting this post up in advance, and right now I am still working on it. Work keeps getting in the way.

What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?

If I say I don’t know, is that a bad thing? I can tell you some books it is NOT like. Twilight, for instance.

Who or What inspired you to write this book?

The series must go on. Mainly it’s the so-called apocalypse that has spurned me to hurry up, though. I know, I know. It’s superstitious and silly, but I’d like to have it done before December 21st just in case. Not that it’s going to be a conclusion, but it’s the last book where I have any events planned. Book six is going to be as surprising for me as for the readers.

What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest?

Rather that giving you a sales pitch, I’ll let the book speak for itself. I’ve posted several UNEDITED snippets of Heart of the Raven for your reading enjoyment, so if you want to see sex, violence, and a vampire in a bath tub, check them out!

Last but not least, here are the authors I’ve tagged.  They will post their blog on November 14th, so be sure to check them out or you can always stop by in the meantime.

Steve Evans

Sharon Stouter

LC Cooper

Lindsay Downs

 

A Gift – Happy Halloween!

By me 🙂

To celebrate one of my favorite holidays, i want to give you a gift, so, until Nov 2, 2012, download Vampire Morsels Short Story Collection FREE!

Just visit smashwords at :

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/209410

and add the book to your cart. At checkout enter the code:

HE87X

and that’s it! Feel free to share the promotion with your friends, family, coworkers… anyone who could do with a little vampire fun and have a safe and happy Halloween!

Smashwords is getting faster, but… The Saga of the Special Editions

After reading that Smashwords  sped up the approval process for the premium catalog, I decided not to upload a separate NOOK version of the Special Editions through PubIt, but instead let Smashwords distribute it to Barnes and Noble to see if they really were faster.

The answer is yes and no.

I uploaded the books on the 14th and by the 17th – three days later! – I was approved for the premium catalog. This is quite a change from the month it took for Ties of Blood! But, approval isn’t shipping. Despite the fact that books are supposed to ship to Barnes & Noble every Thursday or Friday, mine sat for a week and finally shipped on the 26th – nearly two weeks after it was approved – and as of this posting the books still do not appear on BarnesandNoble.com, which means my official launch will either be incomplete or will have to wait some more.  EDIT: On October 2nd they finally showed up on B&N’s site, almost a week after shipping.

Here’s a breakdown:

  • Uploaded – Sept 14
  • Approved – Sept 17
  • Apple – shipped  Sept 17th – (visible sometime between Oct 15th & 28th)
  • Barnes & Noble – shipped Sept 26th, visible on their site Oct 2nd
  • Diesel –  shipped Sept 19th – was listed on their site by Sept 26th (maybe sooner)
  • Page Foundry – shipped Sept 24th
  • Sony – Shipped Sept 27th (listed on their site Oct 2nd)
  • Kobo – shipped Oct 25 (listed on their site Oct 28)
  • Baker-Taylor – still not shipped as of Oct 28

Bottom line? Yeah, they’ve gotten faster, but if you want to let Smashwords handle all your distribution, and you want it shipped by release date, start  four weeks early.

What are my plans? I intend to let Smashwords handle all versions, though I think I will upload to PubIt initially as I have had no problems with having a Smashwords version and PubIt version, and in fact sell a handful of PubIt versions even after Smashwords shows up, though I always sell more SW copies. Example:

  • September B&N sales through SW=72
  • September PubIt sales =14

And PubIt pays monthly, as opposed to SW quarterly, so it puts a little money in my pocket in the meantime.

, if you’re interested in the extended editions then get the links from my Amaranthine Special Edition Page.`

With a Little Help From My Friends or It Takes a Village

This was written for Self Published Authors’ Lounge but not sure when it will post there so I am going to go ahead and schedule it here.

Everyone writes a book differently and each author swears by their own methods.  As far as I see it, the only wrong way is the way that doesn’t work for you. That said, I’m going to share my bizarre way of novel creation. When I say it takes a village, I mean it.

  1. Rough (bad) draft. Ideally, I like to do this in a month without an outline. I have vague ideas for some plot elements, or even a handful of scenes, but that’s about it. I also don’t research beforehand, but rather as I’m writing because I don’t know what I will need.
  2. I reread and fix anything major I notice. I won’t lie, this is often not a lot.
  3. It’s off the beta reader number one whose job is to find major typos. I have a lot of them because, yes, I’m a bit dyslexic. It means some extra work on the polishing end and that we have to go over it more times than some other authors need to, but it is as it is.
  4. At this stage it used to go to The Mighty Ed (alas I have lost her because of other commitments, though I have a new Ed in training). She would read through and point out scenes that needed cut, scenes that needed expanded, parts that didn’t mesh, places where the characters acted out of character etc. This step is absolutely vital to any book, and I can not reiterate enough the need for an “Ed” who respects you enough to tell you what needs fixed without being mean or lecturing you. It may also be hard to take said advice the first (few) times because essentially they tear your book to shreds and stomp on it – but hopefully in a nice way.
  5. Now comes rework. I  incorporate 99.9% of her suggestions, even if this means massive rewriting, which it has before. I prefer to go over the whole thing two times afterwards to make sure the changes flow.
  6. Beta number one tirelessly pours over it again for typos.
  7. Now it goes to beta number two. He corrects more typos and points out the flaws in my fight scenes and  suggests where I need more gore (or explosions). He’s also what I call an honest beta, in so far as he will flat out say “this sucks”. Again, this is very necessary.
  8. Another round of edits to incorporate his suggestions and probably some rewriting.
  9. Beta number one looks sad, but looks over it again.
  10. Now it goes to beta number three. She’s the romance expert but also makes suggestions on other scenes, catches typos and grammar and points out anything that might be confusing to a reader. This is invaluable.
  11. Another round of edits to incorporate her suggestions.
  12. Beta number one cries, I feel bad, and just send it on the beta number four.
  13. Beta four wades through it, fixes typos and some odd phrases and may or may not point out a handful of scenes that need to be redone.  For example, in book four I ended up doing some large chapter rewrites after he pointed out that  a pivotal scene just wasn’t working (if you’ve read the book, it was the truck stop scene.) He is also not a regular vampire fan, so he points out anything that non-vampire readers might find confusing. This is another super important person.
  14. I rewrite, re-edit, etc based on his suggestions. I also have several long plot arranging conversations with him, so he gets to be the sounding board, as have poor Mighty Ed  and betas one and two throughout the whole of this process.
  15. Then it  is off to beta number five. She is a whiz at catching typos/grammar, plot inconsistencies and things like magically changing hair color or magically clean clothes (these have both happened!)  etc. and, like The Mighty Ed, she understands the universe and the characters. This is something that is very hard to find and so, so important!
  16. Another round of edits and rewrites and then poor beta number one looks it over again. By now beta one and I have it memorized and are both sick of this book.
  17. Mighty Ed gets the final copy, which she double checks for punctuation (my commas are wild). With book four, Mighty Ed was pretty busy, so beta five got the final round. She did a fantastic job, as evidenced by the nice clean copy.
  18. Now I make a bunch of other changes. Beta number one sobs and threatens to beat her head into the keyboard. I moan and complain that this must be the worst book ever written. I would rather stab out my eyes than read it again.
  19. I format it and send it to Create Space. My paperback version arrives and I read it one more time (it reads differently in paperback). Then poor beta one looks at it again as does beta two. We draw circles, squares and chickens on the pages (beta two does the chicken art).
  20. I redo all of the marked things. On the last boo this was just typos and such, but on the others I have randomly added whole new scenes at this juncture.
  21. Ideally I get a second proof and go through it a final time, but not always.
  22. I publish the sucker and vow never to read it again because i would rather be stampeded to death by a herd of water buffalo than ever read another word of it!

As you can see, this process is a bit long. I need to try to streamline this because, as you can guess, it takes months and releasing only one book a year is not doing my career any favors. It’s occurred to me that a lot of time is spent polishing scenes that get deleted or changed after beta reader’s input, so with my current WIP (PATRICK) I am trying a different method. I sent out the initial bad draft (from step 4) and will compile the comments, notes, etc, and the do a BIG rewrite, thereby hopefully meshing steps 4-15 into only a couple of steps. Hopefully this will also save beta one’s sanity and keep me from completely hating the book by the time it’s published. Or maybe not.  Cutting out some of the rewrite steps may result in more typos slipping through, or more little bits that needed added but got missed. I don’t know, but I guess we’ll find out. That’s the beauty of indy publishing, you can try new things, make mistakes, learn from it and try something else if it doesn’t work.

Kindlegraph: Yes Virginia, You Can Get Ebooks Signed, So Long As You Have A Kindle

Lest anyone think I am knocking Kindlegraph’s excellent idea, I’m not. The idea of being able to personalize a signature for an ebook is an intriguing idea, so of course I signed up. I currently have six books you can request e-autographs for – assuming you have a kindle.

 

How does it work? As a reader, you go to Kindelgraph.com and search for your favorite authors. The site boasts that there are 3,500 of them, and there’s probably more. If your author is there, it will shoe their name in the search results, then click it for a list of autograph-able books.  Kindlegraph will then send the author a notification and they can log on and sign away.

As an author you first need to register, which is very easy, and then enter the ASIN (found on your book’s amazon page) for each book you’d like to add to their database. Once a book is added, you will get a “test request” from the site’s admin for the first book that allows you to practice your signature and such (more on that in a moment)

On the request page there is space to write a personal message with two fonts to choose from; handwriting and typewriter, and then a second input box for your signature. You can actually use your mouse (stylus, finger, whatever your setup is) to sign your signature, like so:

Or you can “adopt a signature”, which uses that handwritten font again. Once you’ve drawn your signature, kindlegraph saves it, and you never need to do it again, though I have been because when you sign a real book no two signatures look identical, each is one of a kind, and I don’t see why e-signatures should be any different. But then I am kind of a lunatic.

What if you or your readers have a Nook or a Kobo or something else? So far I have been unable to locate any sites that supply signatures to these devices, however, I am keeping my eyes open. If I run across one I’ll be sure to share it and if you know of one I’d love it if you’d let me know.

In the meantime though, there’s always email, right?

 

 

Heir of Nostalgia by Steve Muse

This is an excerpt from Heir of Nostalgia by Steve Muse, available on Amazon.

Blurb:
Age Level: 14 and up | Grade Level: 9 and up

I’m here to tell you, the world never started out this way. It became this way through a mistake, through my pride. I created the Hell we all have to live through. Because of me, the decisions I made, the world has been earmarked for suffering. I tore the veil between life and death. I caused the great shift, the new awakening. Because of me, the world will never be the same.”

Theo Valerian’s world is one of privilege, of always having enough, of having everything go his way. Up until the moment he meets Phillip, a thirteen year old runaway.

Phillip is homeless, hungry, and heartbroken. He’s been living on the streets of New York ever since losing his family. Since that time, the only thing that keeps him going is thoughts of vengeance. He’s looking for the man he feels is responsible for his father’s disappearance, the same man that destroyed his family, a man with silver singing spurs that can walk between worlds. Will a Riot Grrl called Maggie, who claims she can talk to angels, be able to help Phillip? Will a murder of ravens masquerading as teenage thugs defeat them? Or are there stronger forces at work, dark forces? Forces bent on destroying everything in Phillips life?

No one ever said growing up would be easy- then again no one ever said it would be this hard either.

Excerpt:

I finally located Phillip, he was with a man- but before I go there, there is something you must know, the corners of the roof, the corners of the doorways, anything at all that resembled a clear ninety degree angle of any sort; they all began to bleed darkness like a severed artery bleeds blood.

And that darkness the corners bled began to pool.

“Dad?” Not a cry, not an observation, but a plea from my son.

“Don’t worry,” I said, trying to reassure him, “everything is going to be alright.”  But I was lying; everything wasn’t going to be alright, because everything felt so incredibly wrong, starting with the man lounging beside the entrance of the stairwell leading back down into Union Station, the one with his hand on the back of Phillip’s neck, the one with the smirk on his face, raven hair hanging in strings alongside a face so pale, so long, as to appear cartoonish and sinister, the one holding a small silver dagger against my son’s throat.

In the fading light of day, “I’m glad you could join us.”  A voice so harsh, so painful, that simply hearing it is enough to cause headaches and nosebleeds.  Gratingly low, it sounded like what dragging your fist through a box of broken glass would feel like, only in your head.

“What do you want,” I asked.

Over the man’s left shoulder, hanging low upon the horizon, Domiciles sword, the all too familiar comet, like a blood smear drawn across the sky.

The man appeared to be dressed in the rags, the haphazard clothing of a street dweller.  In other words, nothing all that unique or familiar about him, in fact, he could have been anybody, but at the same time it was obvious he was more than that.  From the look on Phillip’s face, the boys stance, his drawn shoulders and hunched back, the man’s grip obviously caused him a great deal of pain.

Before the man answered, he seemed to breathe in deeply, as if ‘tasting’ the very air, like a bloodhound seeking to catch the scent of his recently acquired prey, “Nothing now,” he said.

The way he said this only confirmed what I already knew, that we were in for some serious trouble.  It would take more than simply staring the man down to get rid of him.  If he could be gotten rid of at all.

“Is there anything I can do?  Can we talk about this?”  I hated doing it, bargaining with both our lives, but I’d do anything at the moment.  Try as I might, I couldn’t shake the quivering of fear from my voice.

Phillip immediately picked up on my fear, because of this, any glimmer of hope in his eyes and on his face, quickly vanished, as tears began to leak from his eyes.  ‘Sorry,’ he silently mouthed.

‘It’s alright,’ I returned.

“There is nothing to discuss.  The only reason you two are still breathing is because, it has been such a long time since I’ve been here.  My curiosity has bought you both a momentary stay of execution, that’s all.”

It was obvious, unlike the majority of bad guys portrayed in popular novels, and/or made for the TV or big screen, our ‘bad guy’ was neither stupid nor obnoxiously helpless, simply put, if dark and gruesome had anything to say about it, we were going to die.

The only real question left to answer, was when.


About Steve Muse:

After meeting Frank Herbert, author of the acclaimed Dune Series, I decided the life of writing was for me. That was about 30 years ago, I’ve been writing ever since.

Heir of Nostalgia is my first published novel, and thanks to the encouragement of my loving wife Janet, is the first in a series chronicling the trials and tribulations of young man in search of his family, his country as well as his place in the world.

Here’s to the land of wonder, an air of Nostalgia, and childhood memories. May we never grow too old to dream… Got a question, comment or review, I’d love to hear from you. Simply drop me a line at: heirofnostalgia@gmail.com.

…………………………………………………………………………….

For more information  please visit :


  • Tales of the Executioners

    Short stories from the world of Amaranthine; a universe of blood and darkness where vampires don't sparkle and night is eternal. Each is about a member of the Executioners squad; the special vampire "police" force. Members both past and present share stories of assignments, origins, and more.

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  • Joleene Naylor

    Joleene Naylor

    An independent author, freelance artist, and photographer for fun who loves anime, music, and writing. Check out my vampire series Amaranthine at http://JoleeneNaylor.com or drop me a line at Joleene@JoleeneNaylor.com

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  • Editing services

    devilinthedetailsediting
  • The Ink Slingers Guild
  • Awesome Review Blog

    I Smell Sheep
  • My pet hamster!

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